Catheters

Coloplast SpeediCath Flex Coude Catheter Discreet and Flexible
Introducing: SpeediCath Flex Coudé Catheter
Coloplast Speedicath intermittent catheters are known for being convenient, the easy to open packaging coupled with the ready to use hydrophillic catheter has always being a great choice for catheter users. However, until recently people who use a coude tip catheter weren't able to benefit from the convenience of Speedicath. That has all changed with the release of the SpeediCath Flex Coude catheter system.

Hygienic: [More]

What are Texas Style Condom Catheters?
What are Texas Style Condom Catheters?
Texas style catheters are constructed of three pieces. The latex sheath is worn over the head and shaft of the penis and feels more like a condom because it is thinner than the silicone external condom catheters. The latex sheath is connected to rigid white silicone tubing, this is where the urine is drained and it is connected to a catheter insert. These three pieces make up the Texas style catheter: sheath, white silicone tubing, and catheter insert. Texas style catheters are made of natural rubber latex and should not be used by anyone with a latex allergy. [More]

Pre-Lubricated Catheters vs. Hydrophilic Catheters
A pre-lubricated catheter is an intermittent catheter that is ready to use right out of the package. Before inserting a catheter into the urethra of a man or a woman, the catheter needs to be lubricated. There are several ways you can accomplish this, use a separate sterile lubricant like Surgilube, use a pre-lubricated catheter like Cure Ultra, or you can use a hydrophillic catheter like Coloplast SpeediCath. Pre-lubricated catheters are covered in a gel like sterile lubricant that is immediately ready to use once the catheter is opened. The entire catheter is coated in a "no drip" lubricant. This is different from the hydrophilic style of catheter lubricant because there is no sterile water or sterile saline, the lubricant is actually a lube so it is more gel like and it won't drip water from the packaging. The Cure Ultra catheter also offers another design bonus, the funnel is designed so it won't roll. This is important because when you place your catheter down on a sterile surface, like the underpad found in catheter insertion kits, you don't want your sterile catheter to roll off the counter and hit a floor that is decidedly not sterile. The texture of the Cure Ultra funnel as well as the texture of the gripper sleeve work well even if you deal with dexterity issues in your hands. Personally, I think that Cure catheters do a great job paying attention to details. No roll funnels, grippers that are substantial and easy to hold, lube that doesn't drip, catheters that aren't made with DEHP, BPA, or natural rubber latex, all of these details add up to a catheter that is designed to be used by people with spinal injuries and/or limited dexterity. [More]

Guide to Intermittent Urinary Catheters
What Are the Different Kinds of Intermittent Urinary Catheters?
Coude Catheter - a catheter that has a bent tip for ease of insertion, the angle of the bend can vary
Coude Olive Tip Catheter - a type of coude tip catheter that has a slight bent tip with a rounded balled tip for insertion around an enlarged prostate or strictures [More]

Are Cure Medical Catheters Better?
Urinary catheters are thin flexible tubes used to drain urine from the body. Catheters have been around for a long time, according to URO Today Urology News:
"Catheters were used as early as 3,000 B.C. to relieve painful urinary retention. In those times, many materials were used to form a hollow catheter shape, including straw, rolled up palm leaves, hollow tops of onions, as well as, gold, silver, copper, brass, and lead. Malleable catheters were developed in the 11th century. In time, silver was used as the basis of catheters as it could be bent to any desired shape and was felt to have an antiseptic function."
I am relieved that no one has to cath using roll up palm leaves anymore! Over time catheters have become more comfortable and they are made of silicone or latex red rubber. [More]

How to Use Male External Condom Catheters
Condom catheters are a urinary catheter that is worn on the penis for the treatment of incontinence. Men who can no longer retain urine can use external catheters without having to wear adult incontinence briefs. External condom catheters are worn and when they are connected to a leg bag via extension tubing they funnel and collect urine away from the body. Most commonly external condom catheters are made of either silicone or latex and they are self-adhering, which means there is adhesive on the inside of the catheter that allows it to stay on the outside of the penis. External catheters are not a one-size-fits-all item. You will need to take measurements. In order to use condom catheters, you will need to gather some medical supplies, such as tubing and a leg bag. Just like using any medical device, using external male condom catheters has a learning curve. Be patient with yourself and don't be afraid to contact your medical team or an online medical supply for information on how to best use condom catheters. [More]

What is a Bard Magic3 GO Female Catheter
A female length intermittent catheter can not be used by men because the shaft of the catheter is too short to reach the male bladder. Female catheters are much shorter because the female anatomy doesn't require a long catheter to reach the bladder. The short length of the catheter means it is much easier to design small, discreet catheters that fit easily inside pockets or purses. Bard, formally Rochester, Magic3 GO is a new hydrophilic catheter designed for women that is easy to use and carry with you on the go. Prior to Bard and Rochester Catheters becoming one company, the Magic3 catheters were all produced by Rochester. The company name may have changed but Magic3 is still being produced to the same exacting standards you have come to expect from Rochester Magic3 catheters. [More]

Why Bard Medical Hydrocolloid Condom Catheter Adhesive Matters
Rochester to Bard Medical: Bard Medical is known for innovative Foley catheter products like their Statlock Stabilization Devices and now they have teamed up with Rochester. Bard Medical and Rochester are now one and the same. Over the last few months you may have noticed some products that used to say Rochester now are labeled as Bard. The good news is, only the name has changed. Bard has stated that they will still be making the Rochester catheters and products just like they were made before. So if you are looking for a Rochester product and you can't locate it, try searching for it with the name Bard Medical instead. [More]