Colostomy

Upon reflection, most people view their ostomy as a relief from years or even a lifetime of suffering. Most view this new lifestyle as liberating and welcome the healthy changes it brings to their lives. However, this freedom and healthy change still has some drawbacks and pitfalls to watch for. Two of those pitfalls we are going to discuss today are blockages and hernias. Ostomy Blockages [More]

We live in stressful times, there really is no avoiding it. Most of us have heavy concerns with try to balance our work life and home life, raising our children, providing opportunities for our children to go to college, weddings, dating, concerns about the economy, our future retirement, and the list could go on indefinitely. As well as the numerous other complications that these stressors bring, we often feel these stresses in our stomachs. [More]

Everybody gets some form of heartburn from time to time, but as we get older, it often seems to be more frequent and more severe. Reflux esophagitis refers to a backup of stomach contents into the lower esophagus, where the stomach acids produce a burning sensation. It is commonly known as GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease. [More]

I had ulcerative colitis for 14 years before I became so ill that my colon had to be removed. I was so afraid of having an ostomy that I postponed treatment and nearly died. Knowing my feelings about ostomies, my doctor performed a rarely done straight ileoanal anostomosis when he couldn’t make me a J-pouch. I lived three years of hell with that “straight shot” and had an ileostomy installed in December, 1996. It was the best Christmas I ever gave myself! [More]

Ostomy Help more FAQ
Question: How soon after ostomy surgery can I return to a normal diet?
Answer: Physicians and ostomy nurses suggest that you begin slowly, depending upon your recovery and/or other medical complications. Add back one new food at a time. If you experience any problems, discontinue for a few weeks and try again. [More]

Irrigate Colostomy, ostomy irrigation
Bowel control after a Colostomy depends in part on the nature of the colostomy and in part on the nature of the person. Patients with right-sided colostomies do not have as much remaining colon as those with a left-sided colostomy. Because of this, there is usually too little colon left to absorb enough water to make a solid stool. [More]

Arthritis is the most common non-intestinal condition associated with Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis. Although most people with these diseases do not develop arthritis, three primary kinds may develop:
Rheumatoid-like Arthritis: [More]

Recently we posted a two-part article with tips to prevent medical errors in your medical care. As a follow up to this article, we found an article on the Mount Sinai Hospital website that promotes many of the same tips, as well as a few new ones for us! [More]

If anyone walked a mile in the shoes of an ostomate, how would they feel? What does having an ostomy mean to you? Survey says: good health, no pain, belonging to a group of strong, caring and compassionate people - ostomates, savvy individuals who've learned how and where to get and share knowledge, help, humor and hope. Okay, there hasn’t yet been a comprehensive survey. [More]