Ileostomy

I had ulcerative colitis for 14 years before I became so ill that my colon had to be removed. I was so afraid of having an ostomy that I postponed treatment and nearly died. Knowing my feelings about ostomies, my doctor performed a rarely done straight ileoanal anostomosis when he couldn’t make me a J-pouch. I lived three years of hell with that “straight shot” and had an ileostomy installed in December, 1996. It was the best Christmas I ever gave myself! [More]

Ostomy Help more FAQ
Question: How soon after ostomy surgery can I return to a normal diet?
Answer: Physicians and ostomy nurses suggest that you begin slowly, depending upon your recovery and/or other medical complications. Add back one new food at a time. If you experience any problems, discontinue for a few weeks and try again. [More]

Ostomy Help: Salt and your Ileostomy
We have all heard about the dangers of taking in too much salt in our diet I am sure. Doctors have been warning us to lower our sodium intake and we see commercials on TV on a routine basis reminding us to lower our sodium. The same advice given for your general health also holds true for your health regarding your ileostomy. [More]

Arthritis is the most common non-intestinal condition associated with Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis. Although most people with these diseases do not develop arthritis, three primary kinds may develop:
Rheumatoid-like Arthritis: [More]

hether or not to include fiber, and to what extent, should be based on the ileostomates tolerance of foods. The intestine has a remarkable capacity to adapt. Digested food in the small intestine is quite watery, and after it moves into the large intestine, a good portion of the water is reabsorbed into the body. Most fiber is indigestible material (from plants) that acts like a sponge, soaking up water and increasing the bulk of the intestinal contents ­making matter move through the system more quickly. [More]

If anyone walked a mile in the shoes of an ostomate, how would they feel? What does having an ostomy mean to you? Survey says: good health, no pain, belonging to a group of strong, caring and compassionate people - ostomates, savvy individuals who've learned how and where to get and share knowledge, help, humor and hope. Okay, there hasn’t yet been a comprehensive survey. [More]

As an ostomate, you have obviously spent time in the hospital even if only for your ostomy surgery. During your hospital stay, some of you received support from friends and family, some of you received support from visiting nurses or fellow ostomates, some of you however may have started this journey on your own. For this reason, a common practice among ostomates, friends of ostomates, and many ostomy chapter association groups is to visit new ostomates in the hospital [More]

A Book Review of Brenda Elsagher’s I’d Like To Buy A Bowel Please Ostomy A to Z (2006)
I recently had the opportunity to hear Brenda Elsagher’s offbeat presentation. She is a stand-up comedian, a parent and wife, an author, a public speaker and advocate, an ostomate, and runs her own business. She is also highly involved in her community. Does she live a full life after her surgery? I’ll leave that for you to decide. [More]